WHY Did So Many Regulations Have To Be Suspended To Effectively Enable Faster Treatment Of the DTMNBM?

If you’ve been paying attention AT ALL over the last four or five decades, you have no doubt noticed that regulations and rules have multiplied almost exponentially, all in the name of “safety.” Little bit by little bit each new regulation has chipped away at our freedoms and our rights, and the noose of control has been increasingly tightened around our necks to such a degree that it has nearly choked the life out of us.

C. Douglas Golden, a writer for the Western Journal, asked a question that I think should be more in the front of our thinking since the outbreak of the DTMNBN (the Disease That May Not Be Named, per various social media platforms).

His question reads: “If suspending these regulations and getting bureaucratic organs like the CDC and FDA out of the way is so meliorative, why do we need that interference in the first place?”

Representative Dan Crenshaw put out a video reviewing the regulatory process that has ballooned over the years that had a hand in preventing getting an effective test for the DTMNBN to the USA and to the world.

Representative Crenshaw said, “It only took them a few days, and it only took them a few days to get it up to millions of tests.”

And, “That’s the situation we’re in now. They loosened those restrictions and our private industry has stepped up to the plate.”

From And, “That’s the situation we’re in now. They loosened those restrictions and our private industry has stepped up to the plate.”

From Representative Crenshaw’s Twitter feed:

 

A report in the NYT quoted Dr. Helen Y. Chu, who tried to start coronavirus testing in Seattle when cases were first confirmed in January, but the government regulatory roadblocks had the ability to stop her.

The NYT report also said, “As luck would have it, Dr. Chu had a way to monitor the region. For months, as part of a research project into the flu, she and a team of researchers had been collecting nasal swabs from residents experiencing symptoms throughout the Puget Sound region.”

Dr. Chu was handcuffed by the necessity of having to get the testing approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but, as the Times noted, “But the F.D.A. could not offer the approval because the lab was not certified as a clinical laboratory under regulations established by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, a process that could take months.”

From the Western Journal:

The question asks itself: If suspending these regulations and getting bureaucratic organs like the CDC and FDA out of the way is so meliorative, why do we need that interference in the first place?

“[T]he Seattle Flu Study illustrates how existing regulations and red tape — sometimes designed to protect privacy and health — have impeded the rapid rollout of testing nationally, while other countries ramped up much earlier and faster,” The Times reported. “Faced with a public health emergency on a scale potentially not seen in a century, the United States has not responded nimbly.”

No, it hasn’t — and it’s clear these regulations have impeded our ability to deal with the coronavirus.

The power of government can be used in positive ways when dealing with a crisis like COVID-19. It’s clear we’re in a war of containment at the moment.

However, part of that war is against red tape enacted by bureaucrats who couldn’t comprehend the problems they would cause. When that’s the case, it’s time to stop mindlessly regulating.

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