Jordan Peterson has contracted COVID-19 in a Serbian hospital, reports his daughter in an interview Thursday with The Sun.

Mikhaila Peterson, 28-year-old daughter of famed clinical psychologist and cultural phenomenon Jordan Peterson, told The Sun that her father caught coronavirus in the Serbian clinic in which he is being treated for Benzodiazepine withdrawals.

Jordan Peterson has been receiving treatment for Benzodiazepine dependency over the past several months. He was prescribed the anti-anxiety medication after an “auto-immune reaction to food which resulted in severe insomnia,” reported his daughter.

When his wife was diagnosed with cancer in 2019, his doctor increased his prescription to help him deal with the stress, but this created an adverse reaction.

His daughter and son-in-law found him treatment at a Russian hospital after having no success at American clinics.

Peterson sat down for an interview with his daughter last month to recount the past year of trials in their family, to update his followers on his recovery, and to warn listeners about any prolonged use of the Benzodiazepine drug.

Mikhaila told The Sun that they arrived in Serbia when the government was opening everything back up in preparation for upcoming elections. When COVID rates began to rise again, the country was shut down again. The Peterson family decided to quarantine together in the clinic in which Peterson was being treated.

According to Mikhaila, they all tested negative for COVID when their quarantine began. “Ten days into quarantine, we all get symptoms.” For her and her husband, the virus was not that bad, but for her father, it has resulted in pneumonia.

“It ended up affecting both of my dad’s lungs,” she said.

“Preemptively he was put on anti-virals and things and I’m not sure, to tell you the truth, if that was necessary because his symptoms weren’t that bad. He didn’t have a cough. He had a mild fever. But they just put him on everything.”

Mikhaila said this has been “a step back in his recovery”, explaining that “one of the antibiotics they used actually doesn’t work well with people with Benzodiazepine withdrawals.”

“He’ll get better, but he’s definitely taken a step back and it’s just really unfortunate…it’s been a disaster.” 

Caitlin Bassett

Caitlin Bassett graduated from Liberty University in 2017 with her Bachelor's in Politics and Policy. She grew up in the great Pacific Northwest, but now calls Northern California home as she pursues ministry school.

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