Tick Tok is a video system that allows people to create short videos with effects and music and share them with viewers. The app was previously called Musical.ly and originally was created mainly for consumers to create videos lip-syncing to music, but was turned into Tick Tock in 2018. The app switched names when a Chinese company named ByteDance merged the two, according to theverge.com.

But now Tick Tok is under fire after suspicions of data being sent to China. As reports developed and research was conducted further, President Trump got involved, and now Tick Tok is in danger of being banned.

Personally, I don’t think this is such a bad thing. I was in high school when Musical.ly became the Tick Tok of the time. As I heard more about the app, the crazier I thought it was. What is so entertaining about someone you’ve never met lip-syncing for 15 seconds? 

Well, soon it became people dancing and creating other videos. I had a friend create such a video and it wasn’t exactly appropriate. When I called them out for it, I looked at their followers. I had created a fake account to see the video that I had heard so much about. When I looked at their followers I saw my account as well as some random people, and a few from our school, whom I suspect leaked the video to the rest of the grade. 

My friend had no idea who was following them and they probably didn’t even care. After all, you do it for the views, right? They didn’t care that people they had never met, and probably never would, were watching them dance.

Sounds a bit creepy to me. 

How narcissistic our society has become that we will make video after video dancing or lip-syncing and expecting people to watch and applaud. Oddly enough, people who may have few followers on social media end up with thousands of views on Tick Tok. It’s entertaining for some reason. 

But it’s also dangerous.

Maybe I’m old-fashioned, but I don’t see how advertising yourself dancing or singing on an app like that for thousands if not millions of people to watch is safe. I am very careful what I post on social media as I accept many friend requests for viewership of my work. I barely share personal or family information as I don’t know who is reading my posts or work. As we’ve seen with recent Epstein news, there are a ton of creeps out there. 

Facebook, which was originally created with the purpose of people connecting with one another has instead become a platform for bragging about accomplishments, vacations, and arguing with one another in comments. It also provides an outlet for said creeps to create fake accounts and find children and teenagers to abduct for heinous crimes. Am I saying Facebook is evil? No, but with all social media, you have to be extremely careful. And now they’ve created a replacement for Tick Tok, Reels.

When discussing the Tick Tok situation, Trump had said that if a US-based organization would buy the app, he would consider allowing it to remain in existence. Soon, various organizations including Microsoft began talking about buying the company. 

Why, though, was keeping an app that has proved potentially dangerous to not only kids but also America such a big deal? You would think people would want to see the end of something that could be so harmful. Instead, Narcissism and greed prevailed as the latest news became who would buy Tick Tok and keep it in circulation. 

One would think in a world of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and countless other social media, dating apps, and sharing sites, the loss of Tick Tok wouldn’t be so bad. After all, there are plenty of outlets for people to show off how great they think they are. 

Instead, Facebook came to the rescue of the millions of Tick Tok users reeling (pun intended) from the loss of their narcissism outlet. 

Will Reels be safer for America? Maybe from the perspective of national security. But it will continue to feed and grow a selfish culture that seeks to gain views and find their value in attention from strangers. 

 

Brittany Slaughter is an opinion writer for DavidHarrisJr.com. Her work can be found in The Washington Examiner, Campus Reform, The College Fix, New Right Network, and The Hill. She is published in the book She’s Conservative- Stories of Trials and Triumphs on America’s College Campuses.  She is a journalist dedicated to standing up for the truth, even when it is unpopular.

Brittany Slaughter

Brittany Slaughter is an opinion writer for DavidHarrisJr.com. Her work can be found in The Washington Examiner, Campus Reform, The College Fix, New Right Network, and The Hill. She is published in the book She’s Conservative- Stories of Trials and Triumphs on America’s College Campuses. She is a journalist dedicated to standing up for the truth, even when it is unpopular. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @BSlaughterReal.

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